Vampire Repellent Pepper Spray

A well-known deterrent against vampires is to ingest garlic and to wear garlic cloves around your neck at all times. Of course gnawing on garlic release a odorous smell that is almost impossible to get rid of. This is because after chewing garlic there is a Sulphur containing chemical called allicin that is produced, and Sulphur containing compounds (thiols) are well known to smell putrid.

The odor is often associated with rotting eggs or rotting meat, and this is exactly what people wanted to produce, as surrounding oneself with this smell is thought to offer protection against the evil vampires. The Romanians took this even farther by smearing garlic on every nook and cranny (including their doors, windows, gates and even cows). Now the question that arises is, “Why is Garlic useful against vampires?”.  Wouldn’t it be more logical to perpetuate a myth where vampires are terrified of something that smells pleasant, rather than something that smells nauseous?

One of the possible explanation for this strange belief is that garlic is known to have anti-bacterial qualities. Garlic was used to ward off various diseases, such as the plague, and it is believed to have many health benefits. In fact, there have been many scientific studies showing the anti-bacterial properties of garlic. As vampires were associated with “evil”, a category that diseases and plagues belong to, one might assume that garlic might also ward off this evil. Another hypothesis is that garlic is a natural mosquito repellent. Since vampires are also blood sucking creatures, having an odor of garlic might tend to repel them away also.

A new hypothesis that recently came out is that the burning of arsenic compounds started off this whole trend. This might sound a bit preposterous, but there is certain logic to the argument. During the time vampire lore was dominant; Arsenic, a very potent poison, was believed to hold power over evil. This stems from the ancient ideology that one must fight evil with evil, and what better evil to use than a highly toxin poison. This ideology as it turns out isn’t too absurd, as arsenic based compounds do have certain anti-bacterial properties. This ideology was strongly held by many alchemists in major cities like Prague and Moravia at that time. When alchemists were hired to ward off vampires, they would burn arsenic containing compounds to provide the illusion that they were warding off evil with powerful evil slaying odors. These arsenic containing compounds when burned would provide a nasty aroma that smells exactly like that of garlic. The peasants would, of course, notice this and make the connection that chewing garlic would produce the same effect, and would be less expensive than hiring an alchemist. This homemade remedy is extremely cheap and easy to produce, and thus most likely spread very quickly among the peasant population.

Today, we have a much easier way to fend off these creatures of the night.  Combining a blend of orthochlorobenzalmalonitrile, alphachloroacetaphenone, and oleoresin capsicum, with a touch of garlic, we have formulated the essential ingredients guaranteed to repel not only vampires, but also creepy humans and all the Renfields out there.

Vampire Repellent Pepper Spray comes infused with the essence of garlic. A fusion of pepper and garlic might sound like a great addition to any Italian dish, but DO NOT use this spray in your fettuccine alredo. Measuring in at 2 million scoville heat units, a direct shot of this hot concoction will cause the eyes and throat to swell up, making it hard to see and even harder to enjoy your pasta.

With a quick release keychain, a safety lock, and a touch of garlic, Vampire Repellent Pepper Spray is everything you need to safely deal with your vampire stalker.  Get it today, and feel armed and safe tonight.  Visit The Covert Eye for all your safety and security needs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampire

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